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Metropolitan City of Rome의 대중교통

공원
“the second biggest parc of Rome, there are many things to visit inside, like museum Borghese, terrace Il Pincio, Water Clock, Ippodromo, fountains and much more...”
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유적지
“Amphitheatrum Flavium is the most famous and impressive monument of ancient Rome, as well as the largest amphitheater in the world. ”
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미술관
“You cannot come and visit Rome without exploring the magnificence of the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museum! Ask our staff to organize your perfect first visit”
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Landmark
“Piazza Navona is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in the 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans went there to watch the agones ("games"), and hence it was known as "Circus Agonalis" ("competition arena"). It is believed that over time the name changed to in avone to navone and eventually to navona. Defined as a public space in the last years of 15th century, when the city market was transferred there from the Campidoglio, Piazza Navona was transformed into a highly significant example of Baroque Roman architecture and art during the pontificate of Innocent X, who reigned from 1644 until 1655, and whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced the piazza. It features important sculptural creations: in the center stands the famous Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi or Fountain of the Four Rivers (1651) by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, topped by the Obelisk of Domitian, brought in pieces from the Circus of Maxentius; the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone by Francesco Borromini, Girolamo Rainaldi, Carlo Rainaldi and others; and the aforementioned Pamphili palace, also by Girolamo Rainaldi, that accommodates the long gallery designed by Borromini and frescoed by Pietro da Cortona. Piazza Navona has two other fountains. At the southern end is the Fontana del Moro with a basin and four Tritons sculpted by Giacomo della Porta (1575) to which, in 1673, Bernini added a statue of a Moor, wrestling with a dolphin. At the northern end is the Fountain of Neptune (1574) also created by Giacomo della Porta; the statue of Neptune, by Antonio Della Bitta, was added in 1878 to create a balance with La Fontana del Moro.”
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기념물/랜드마크
“The Pantheon is a former Roman temple, now a Catholic church (Basilica di Santa Maria ad Martyres), on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. The building is cylindrical with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43 metres (142 ft). Since the Renaissance the Pantheon has been the site of several important burials. Among those buried there are the painters Raphael and Annibale Carracci, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi. In the 15th century, the Pantheon was adorned with paintings: the best-known is the Annunciation by Melozzo da Forlì. Filippo Brunelleschi, among other architects, looked to the Pantheon as inspiration for their works.”
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Landmark
“The Trevi Fountain is the largest and one of the most famous fountains in Rome. Built on the facade of Palazzo Poli by Nicola Salvi, the competition launched by Pope Clement XII in 1731 was initially won by the French sculptor Lambert-Sigisbert Adam but later the task passed to Salvi: it is said that the change was due to the fact that the pontiff did not want to entrust the work to a foreigner; instead, another version explains that Adam had to return to France. Begun in 1732, it was completed thirty years later by Giuseppe Pannini; stylistically it belongs to the late Baroque.”
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“The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo (English: Castle of the Holy Angel), is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum.  A stone's throw from St. Peter's Square, it is connected to the Vatican State through the fortified corridor of the "passetto". The castle has been radically modified several times in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.”
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지역
“A charming and characteristic neighborhood of Rome, on the other side of the Tiber River, known for its cobblestone alleys and sprawling artistic piazzas. This neighborhood is as famous for its street food (suppli, trappizzino, pizza rossa) as it is many notable restaurants some of which are Michelin-starred. You can also find as many churches as you can artisanal trendy shops. It is definitely worth a visit.”
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공원
“Villa Doria Pamphili is a succession of surprising views and historic buildings immersed in the lush vegetation of one of the largest green areas in the city. It has a perimeter of 6.5 km and extends over 184 hectares and, in addition to being a park, it is also a splendid monumental villa, so green that it was also known as the 'Bel Respiro' (Beautiful Breath). One of the accesses to Villa Doria Pamphili is Piazza di San Pancrazio (St Pancras's Square). This place was already talked of in the mediaeval period - the pilgrim itineraries (the old 'guides') indicated the Santuario di San Pancrazio (St Pancras's Sanctuary) to those arriving from the north. This is a beautiful church that, finding itself on a pilgrimage route, could offer a welcome to the wayfarers in its monastery; it also had a Catacomb in its crypt full of valuable frescoes. Today, the underground cemetery contains graffiti, traces of old paintings and lots of loculi making its dark corners even more mysterious. When the estate along the Via Aurelia was bought by Panfilo Pamphili in 1630, there was only the Villa Vecchia, the oldest building, inside it. However, between 1644 and 1652, under the papacy of Innocent X Pamphili, the architects Algardi and Grimaldi built the complex of the Villa Nuova, which became the residence of Camillo Pamphili, the Pope's nephew. At the beginning, the villa was divided into three parts - the building and gardens (pars urbana), the pinewood (pars fructuaria) and the farm (pars rustica), but the Pamphili family had the so-called 'Casino di Allegrezze' designed and built. This was to host parties and large receptions while the park and the 'Giardini di delizie' (Gardens of Delight) were arranged around the Palazzo where the games and pastimes of the Roman nobility were held for many years. The scene must have been enchanting because of the incredible number of rare plants and flowers kept with such care and in such quantity that they could be used to extract perfumes, not counting the oranges, lemons, cedars and ilexes in which coloured birds of various species and from distant places nested. The plants were in decorated terracotta vases or put directly into the ground. 
The scene was completed by lots of fountains, almost all designed by Algardi, fed by a Roman aqueduct that Pope Paul V had refurbished at the end of the 14th century and which took the name of Acquedotto Paolo. Deer and fallow deer, pheasants and many other species of animals kept specially to entertain guests who went hunting, the favourite sport of the nobility, ran free among the poplars and pines in the depths of the woods and glades. Today, after entering by Porta S. Pancrazio, the Arco dei Quattro Venti (the Four Winds Arch) is directly ahead. A little further on there is Palazzina Corsini dating to the 18th century and part of the Villa Corsini from the same century. From here, there is a breathtaking view of the Valle dei Daini (Fallow Deer Valley) where these animals roam freely and which was cleared in 2000 after years of negligence. The Fontana del Giglio lies beyond the pinewood, and features plays of water that flow into the Laghetto del Belvedere (the Belvedere Lake), a natural basin which underwent alterations and extensions over the years without changing the water supply. Only a recent restoration has improved the inflow and outflow of the water while the historic paths created for the beauty spots ('belvedere') have been rearranged. The Cappella Doria Pamphili (Doria Pamphili Chapel), a little way away, was the last of the buildings constructed in the villa between 1896 and 1902. The Villa Vecchia or Casino di Famiglia, the original building, is on the side of the Via Aurelia Antica which, at this point, runs alongside the ruins of the Acquedotto Traiano-Paolo (Traiano-Paolo Aqueduct), whose material was 'reused' to build the villa. The gardens of the Villa Vecchia were famous for the great number of citrus trees. At the end of the 19th century, they appeared to be paths with sweeping curves that enclosed various types of trees, flowerbeds in designs and many palms which gave an exotic appearance. The west part of the Villa recalls the Roman countryside and is an excellent place to laze, walk or do open-air sports. As a result of its position, Villa Doria Pamphili also has interesting archaeological remains; these include a Roman necropolis where two tombs from the Augustan age were found, decorated with splendid frescoes and which can be admired in the Museo Nazionale Romano. The mediaeval Casale di Giovio, built on a little Roman funerary temple, is on a small hill, once more in the western part. Villa Doria Pamphili was extended and altered in the middle of the 19th century but the villa was inexorably divided in two by the opening of a dual-carriage way, bearing the name of Leo XIII, in 1960. In 1967, the complex was acquired by the state and Rome City Council and was at long last opened to the public. Today, it is the ideal place to laze, have a picnic, do open-air sport or simply walk in a lush, green oasis in the chaotic heart of Rome. Casino del Bel Respiro The Casino del Bel Respiro is one of the most beautiful buildings of Villa Pamphili, also known as Palazzina dell'Algardi in memory of the architect whose intention was to express the magnificence of the noble family. It was commissioned by Giovanni Battista Pamphili, who became Pope with the name of Innocence X. It was the home of valuable art collections, and recreational events, parties and meetings were held there. The palace was inspired by the villas of Palladio while the furnishing and gardens recalled ancient noble residences, in particular Villa Adriana at Tivoli, where Algardi used to go to study and draw. The building has a façade on two levels on the main side and, to overcome the difference in the level of the ground, three levels on the side where the Giardino Segreto (Secret Garden) was created. 
This secluded and picturesque oasis was embellished by hedges shaped to form designs like the fleur-de-lys, the family crest, and many statues which also decorated the access drive to the Casino. Two fishponds were planned along the short sides of the garden but only one was actually created. A fountain in the centre completed the scene. The Giardino Segreto leads to the Giardino del Teatro (Theatre Garden), a semi-circular construction which hosted certain theatrical events.”
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교회
“The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave which is within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and the largest church in the world. Heart of the Catholic Church, the Basilica stands where in 324 Constantine had a sanctuary built in honor of the First Apostle who was crucified and buried in that very place. In 1506, Pope Julius II commissioned Donato Bramante to plan the construction of what would be the largest church in the world (22,000 square meters). Bramante, Michelangelo, Giacomo della Porta, were just some of the architects who succeeded in the "factory of San Pietro" in the more than one hundred years it took to complete the grandiose work. The major artists of the Roman Renaissance and the Baroque have left you masterpieces of extraordinary beauty, just think of the marvelous Pietà by Michelangelo, the Chair of St. Peter, the monument of Urban VIII and the sumptuous Baldacchino by Bernini. To the east of the basilica is the Piazza di San Pietro, (St. Peter's Square). The present arrangement, constructed between 1656 and 1667, is the Baroque inspiration of Bernini who inherited a location already occupied by an Egyptian obelisk which was centrally placed. ”
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광장
“Piazza di Spagna, at the bottom of the Spanish Steps, is one of the most famous squares in Rome. It owes its name to the Palazzo di Spagna, seat of the Embassy of Spain to the Holy See. Nearby is the famed Column of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In the middle of the square is the famous Fontana della Barcaccia, dating to the beginning of the baroque period, sculpted by Pietro Bernini and his son, the more famous Gian Lorenzo Bernini. SPANISH STEPS The imposing 135-step staircase was inaugurated by Pope Benedict XIII during the 1725 Jubilee; it was released (thanks to French loans granted in 1721–1725) to connect the Bourbon Spanish embassy (from which the square takes its name) to the Church of Trinità dei Monti. At the right corner of the Spanish Steps rises the house of the English poet John Keats, who lived there until his death in 1821: nowadays it has been changed into a museum dedicated to him and his friend Percy Bysshe Shelley, displaying books and memorabilia of English romanticism. At the left corner there is the Babington's tea room, founded in 1893.”
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Border Crossing
“The Papal Archbasilica of Saint John [in] Lateran is the oldest and highest ranking of the four papal major basilicas, holding the unique title of "archbasilica". It is the oldest public church in the city of Rome, and the oldest basilica of the Western world. It houses the cathedra of the Roman bishop and has the title of ecumenical mother church of the Catholic faithful. The Basilica, which was immediately richly decorated, was often the object of devastation and depredation by the so-called barbarian invaders and over the centuries it underwent numerous restorations and renovations. Among the most important are the works by Pope Boniface VIII for the first great Jubilee of 1300: they were called Cimabue and Giotto for the decorations of the new Loggia delle Benedizioni, today unfortunately lost. At the end of 1300, with the definite return of the popes to Rome after the period of Avignon captivity, it was decided to transfer the papal see to the Vatican. From 1600 onwards it was the great Francesco Borromini who took care of its rearrangement, under the patronage of Pope Innocent X first and Alexander VII later, who also had the bronze doors of the ancient Curia transferred from the Church of Sant'Adriano to the Roman Forum. Roman that today constitute the great central door of the Basilica. But it will be only in 1700 that the facade will be completed by Alessandro Galilei, while the last major intervention will take place a century later under the pontificates of Pius IX and Leo XIII, although the last addition took place in 2000, with the inauguration of the new Holy Door, the work of the sculptor Floriano Bodini.”
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광장
“Campo de' Fiori is a rectangular square south of Piazza Navona. It is diagonally southeast of the Palazzo della Cancelleria and one block northeast of the Palazzo Farnese. Campo de' Fiori, translated literally from Italian, means "field of flowers". The name dates to the Middle Ages when the area was a meadow. In Ancient Rome, the area was unused space between Pompey's Theatre and the flood-prone Tiber. The square has always remained a focus for commercial and street culture: the surrounding streets are named for trades—Via dei Balestrari (crossbow-makers), Via dei Baullari (coffer-makers), Via dei Cappellari (hat-makers), Via dei Chiavari (key-makers) and Via dei Giubbonari (tailors). With new access streets installed by Sixtus IV— Via Florea and Via Pellegrino— the square became a part of the Via papale ("Pope's road"), the street linking Basilica of St. John Lateran and the Vatican and traversed by the Pope after his election during the so-called "Cavalcata del possesso", when he reached the Lateran from the Vatican to take possession of the city. This urban development brought wealth to the area: A flourishing horse market took place twice a week (Monday and Saturday) and many bar, restaurants and shops came to be situated in Campo de' Fiori. ”
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광장
“Piazza del Popolo is a large urban square in Rome. The name in modern Italian literally means "People's Square", but historically it derives from the poplars (populus in Latin, pioppo in Italian) after which the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, in the northeast corner of the piazza, takes its name. The piazza lies inside the northern gate in the Aurelian Walls, once the Porta Flaminia of ancient Rome, and now called the Porta del Popolo. This was the starting point of the Via Flaminia, the road to Ariminum (modern-day Rimini) and the most important route to the north. At the same time, before the age of railroads, it was the traveller's first view of Rome upon arrival. For centuries, the Piazza del Popolo was a place for public executions, the last of which took place in 1826. The layout of the piazza today was designed in neoclassical style between 1811 and 1822 by the architect Giuseppe Valadier,[1] He removed a modest fountain by Giacomo Della Porta, erected in 1572,[2] and demolished some insignificant buildings and haphazard high screening walls to form two semicircles, reminiscent of Bernini's plan for St. Peter's Square, replacing the original cramped trapezoidal square centred on the Via Flaminia. Valadier's Piazza del Popolo, however, incorporated the verdure of trees as an essential element; he conceived his space in a third dimension, expressed in the building of the viale that leads up to the balustraded overlook from the Pincio. ”
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Route
“Via del Corso is a main street in the historical centre of Rome. Today, the Corso is a popular place for the "passeggiata", the evening stroll for the populace to be seen and to see others. It is also an important shopping street for tourists and locals alike. Here you can find the big national and international stores, as well as small shops with great bargains. Without a shadow of doubt chic shopping in Rome is traditionally done in the Tridente neighbourhood. The street itself is remarkable for being absolutely straight in an area characterized by narrow meandering alleys and small piazzas. The length of the street is roughly 1.5 kilometres. The Corso runs in a generally north-south direc”
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Museum
“The Borghese gallery is located in piazzale del Museo Borghese 5, inside the Villa Borghese Pinciana in Rome in Italy. The museum exhibits works by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Agnolo Bronzino, Antonio Canova, Caravaggio, Raphael, Perugino, Lorenzo Lotto, Antonello da Messina, Cranach, Annibale Carracci, Pieter Paul Rubens, Bellini, Tiziano. It can be considered unique in the world as regards the number and importance of Bernini's sculptures and Caravaggio's paintings.”
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